Why my love for coffee just doesn't cut it anymore

Posted by Emily Coppola on

You rock into the office. Some days you're pumped, other days you're dragging your feet - that's just how it goes. Whatever your mood, there's something so soothing, warming, reassuring about a hot drink. The proof is in the flock of city-folk clutching their coffee cups in suits, power-walking the streets on their way to work, and the queues of self-confessed Melbourne coffee snobs queuing up for their favourite brew.

I have always found coffee to be nothing short of delightful. Perhaps something to do with my Italian background and being brought up on coffee and red wine... there's no surprise I love the stuff. (Actually, forget the Euro-heritage bit, it could just be the fact that it's so damn good.) Unfortunately, I have come to the realisation that coffee just doesn't love me back.

You see, I operate at 100 miles an hour. I walk fast, talk fast... hey, I'm even typing at the speed of light right now. I'm barely started on a new project and I'm conjuring up the next one. So while coffee makes me feel amazingly powerful and productive at first, it ends with jitters, burnt-out adrenals, my insides in a knot, and an overall feeling of edginess and anxiety.

It takes guts to stop and listen. I have been stopping more regularly of late, and listening more intently to what my body is saying. It's telling me that coffee is a really big no-no. The best thing that I can do for my wellbeing is to slow down, and find things that help me to slow down. Coffee just isn't one of them, in fact it's the complete opposite.

Is your body, mind or soul telling you something? Are you really listening?

Perhaps it's a toxic relationship that makes your insides churn. Maybe it's dairy? Or - like me - perhaps you need to have a break from adrenaline-pumping coffee. Whatever your ailment, listen closely to your body and it will tell you everything you need to know.

VT xx

 

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